Your military service...

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Marc Martyn
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RE:Your military service...

Post by Marc Martyn » Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:27 am

Veterans Day-2010:salut:

The site is growing rapidly with new members each day signing on. If you are a vet, tell us about your service experience.

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RE:Your military service...

Post by dicinu » Thu Nov 11, 2010 6:00 pm

joined the airforce in 1995 december basic in lackland AFB Tx. worked as a bomb loader on the fighting eagles f15's fist base Seemore Johnson (lol) Afb Nc. stayed 3 years then cross trained to CE as an Electrician stayed another 2 yrs station @ Altus Ok. then my calling back in the civiilian world. in my time never deployed although I did ask to go anywhere and everywhere over seas. I had the option to stay Civil service I declined in my time station I did show our friends over seas how to load bombs The Isreali Air force and also had a recieved a ride in the F15 Eagles in las vegas Nv where my mom and dad watched me take off on the flight line 2 hrs later they were still there waiting to see if I was going to get sick haha. talk about a rush best ever. currently out of all my friend in the military those that are still in I do keep in touch with them and most went commision to be Officers the ones that got out regret getting out. as to show planning your future helps plus having a father that owns a masonary company also. helped me out alot. highest rank was E-4 tested for staff 1 time and missed by 20 points without studing. furthest I got overseas was england which i do not count was to arrive for a 6 month deplyment and called back on the plane to come home they changed which Squad. was going to go. nice long boring flight Pissed off for not being able to stay. I am a Vet of a foreign war which is still going on althought I do not claim as I wish I could of played a better roll in the war then making sure the base commander had power. stateside base commander!
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Marc Martyn
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RE:Your military service...

Post by Marc Martyn » Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:44 pm

Bump......there has to be some new members that at former or current military.

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RE:Your military service...

Post by Big D » Sat Jun 18, 2011 12:31 am

US Navy Summer 1977 until summer 1992. I served onboard various ships and commands to include:
USS Oklahoma City CG-5 homeported in Yokosuka, Japan
USS Camden AOE-2 homeported in Bremerton, WA
USS Truxtun CGN-35 homeported in SanDiego, Calif.
NSGA Adak, Alaska
NavSubBase Bangor, WA
The two best were the USS Oklahoma City CG-5 and My first shore duty that counted as sea duty NSGA Adak,Alaska

Image

This pic is of the Adak National Forest. The sign reads "You are now entering & leaving the Adak, National Forest"

Image
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Fair Winds & Following Seas.
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Marc Martyn
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Re: Your military service...

Post by Marc Martyn » Mon Oct 10, 2011 9:27 pm

I thought it would be appropriate to post this as a reminder of what our service members really mean to us. It was sent to me by an very good friend of mine from high school. I copied it from my email, so I apologize for not taking time to justify the type.

"SOON TO BE GONE"
ByCapt. Steven  Ellison, MD
A  MILITARY DOCTOR

I am a doctor specializing in the Emergency Departments of the only two military Level One-Trauma Centers, both in San Antonio , TX and they care for civilian Emergencies as well as military personnel. San Antonio has the largest military retiree population in the world living here. As a military doctor, I work long hours and the pay is less than glamorous. One tends to become jaded by the long hours, lack of sleep, food, family contact and the endless parade of human suffering passing before you. The arrival of another ambulance does not mean more pay, only more work. Most often, it is a victim from a motor vehicle crash.

Often it is a person of dubious character who has been shot or stabbed. With our large military retiree population, it is often a nursing home patient. Even with my enlisted service and minimal combat experience in Panama, I have caught myself groaning when the ambulance brought in yet another sick, elderly person from one of the local retirement centers that cater to military retirees. I had not stopped to think of what citizens of this age group represented.

I saw 'Saving Private Ryan.' I was touched deeply. Not so much by the carnage, but by the sacrifices of so many. I was touched most by the scene of the elderly survivor at the graveside, asking his wife if he'd been a good man. I realized that I had seen these same men and women coming through my Emergency Dept.. And had not realized what magnificent sacrifices they had made. The things they did for me and everyone else that has lived on this planet since the end of that conflict are priceless.

Situation permitting, I now try to ask my patients about their experiences. They would never bring up the subject without the inquiry. I have been privileged to an amazing array of experiences, recounted in the brief minutes allowed in an Emergency Dept encounter. These experiences have revealed the incredible individuals I have had the honor of serving in a medical capacity, many on their last admission to the hospital.

There was a frail, elderly woman who reassured my young enlisted medic, trying to start an IV line in her arm. She remained calm and poised, despite her illness and the multiple needle-sticks into her fragile veins. She was what we call a 'hard stick.' As the medic made another attempt, I noticed a number tattooed across her forearm. I touched it with one finger and looked into her eyes. She simply said, ' Auschwitz ..' Many of later generations would have loudly and openly berated the young medic in his many attempts. How different was the response from this person who'd seen unspeakable suffering.

Also, there was this long retired Colonel, who as a young officer had parachuted from his burning plane over a Pacific Island held by the Japanese. Now an octogenarian, he had a minor cut on his head from a fall at his home where he lived alone. His CT scan and suturing had been delayed until after midnight by the usual parade of high priority ambulance patients. Still spry for his age, he asked to use the phone to call a taxi, to take him home, and then he realized his ambulance had brought him without his wallet. He asked if he could use the phone to make a long distance call to his daughter who lived 7 miles away. With great pride we told him that he could not, as he'd done enough for his country and the least we could do was get him a taxi home, even if we had to pay for it ourselves. My only regret was that my shift wouldn't end for several hours, and I couldn't drive him myself.

I was there the night M/Sgt Roy Benavidez came through the Emergency Dept. for the last time. He was very sick. I was not the doctor taking care of him, but I walked to his bedside and took his hand. I said nothing. He was so sick; he didn't know I was there. I'd read his Congressional Medal of Honor citation and wanted to shake his hand. He died a few days later.

The gentleman who served with Merrill's Marauders.
The survivor of the Bataan Death March.
The survivor of Omaha Beach.
The 101 year old World War I veteran.
The former POW held in frozen North Korea.
The former Special Forces medic - now with non-operable liver cancer.
The former Viet Nam Corps Commander...

I may still groan when yet another ambulance comes in, but now I am much more aware of what an honor it is to serve these particular men and women. I have seen a Congress who would turn their back on these individuals who've sacrificed so much to protect our liberty. I see later generations that seem to be totally engrossed in abusing these same liberties, won with such sacrifice. It has become my personal endeavor to make the nurses and young enlisted medics aware of these amazing individuals when I encounter them in our Emergency Dept. Their response to these particular citizens has made me think that perhaps all is not lost in the next generation. My experiences have solidified my belief that we are losing an incredible generation, and this nation knows not what it is losing. We should all remember that we must ‘earn this.'
Written
By CAPT. Stephen R. Ellison, M.D. US Army
My own personal note: If it were not for these faithful, loyal, strong persons, there would not be a United States of America. I ask that you pray for these aging and dying service members. I also think every American citizen
Should read this. So, if you agree, send it on.

God Bless....

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Big D
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Re: Your military service...

Post by Big D » Tue Oct 11, 2011 1:39 am

Good read Marc,
Very touching so I took the time. Thanks for posting.

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Re: Your military service...

Post by Marc Martyn » Tue Oct 11, 2011 9:22 am

Don Foster_1.jpg
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Thanks for "straightening up the tie and tucking in the shirt" Darren. I think that it was created on Windows and I am on a Mac. I tried to justify it, but it was late in the evening and it was quite a chore revising it. It looks much better now. [thumbsup]

I have had several customers over the years that are in the "Greatest Generation". They truly have some inspiring and interesting stories. One in particular was a retired Air Force full bird colonel, Donald E. Foster, who at the age of 20 was a B-17 pilot (air craft commander) during WWII. I asked him how he became a pilot at that young age and he replied that his test scores were so high that he qualified for pilot training. He remained in the service all of his life, flying in WWII, Korea, Vietnam and retired as a B-52 pilot. He told me that during WWII, he was escorted by the all black Tuskegee Airmen Mustang P-51 fighter squadron. He also told me that those guys were the best fighter pilots he had ever seen. When the "Red Tails" showed up, he said, his mission went much easier. Take a moment to read what this amazing gentleman accomplished.:salut:

http://www.flight41.org/BIOS/foster.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

They were an amazing generation of people.
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Re: Your military service...

Post by Lotech Joe » Wed Oct 12, 2011 4:23 am

These types of stories grip my patriotism and they don't let go. There are literally thousands of them. Sad to say, fewer and fewer each day though. Even though those were a different kind of war than the ones we have now, there are literally thousands of those stories coming home today. Sad to say, more and more each day.
For clarification, it's good they're coming home, but sad they had to go.

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Marc Martyn
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Re: Your military service...

Post by Marc Martyn » Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:01 pm

Lotech Joe wrote:These types of stories grip my patriotism and they don't let go. There are literally thousands of them. Sad to say, fewer and fewer each day though. Even though those were a different kind of war than the ones we have now, there are literally thousands of those stories coming home today. Sad to say, more and more each day.
For clarification, it's good they're coming home, but sad they had to go.
I don't know if you talked with Clarence Grimes much when we were up at Marshall, but he is another one that comes to mind. He was a navigator/bombardier on a B-17 during WWII. I was up there one afternoon talking with him and he brought out his book on the squadron he was in. In that book, he had his diary he kept of all the missions he flew. His vivid memory of every one of the missions was amazing. I've known Clarence for 51 years and have enjoyed spending time with him every time. Not only was he my fly fishing mentor, he has been a very close friend.

What kind of guy is Clarence? In his late 80's he was diagnosed with cancer. With the option of letting nature take it's coarse or going through Chemo Therapy, Clarence decided to fight it. I asked him why at that age he chose to go through such intense treatment. His reply, "I flew 30 bomb missions over occupied Europe in WWII, why should I let this keep me down". When he was through with his Chemo treatments, he went out deer hunting that fall and got his deer...........God I love that man! :salut:

Side note: The odds of B-17 crew members completing their 30 required missions was...... 1 in 5. :salut: :salut:
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Re: Your military service...

Post by Marc Martyn » Tue Nov 08, 2011 10:52 am

Just a reminder that Applebee's is offering a free meal to all active duty military personnel and veterans on Veteran's Day. [drool]

http://www.applebees.com/menu/vetsday" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Your military service...

Post by Big D » Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:42 am

Jet Pro Car wash in Wenatchee is also offering a free car wash for Veterans on Veterans Day.

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Marc Martyn
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Re: Your military service...

Post by Marc Martyn » Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:31 pm

I just sat down to watch the first segment of Vietnam In HD. From what I have seen so far, it is excellent and well worth watching. It is on The History Channel tonight through Friday night.

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Re: Your military service...

Post by tim crothers » Wed Nov 09, 2011 10:13 am

Joined the U.S. Coast Guard in 1994 and am still in 17 years later as a Chief Petty Officer. Have loved every bit of it even the tough sea duty in the Bearing Straights. Stationed in Alaska, California, Michigan Washington, California, Washington, and Washington again. I am from Yakima so the west coast suits me fine. I am up for transfer this summer and GTMO is top on my list. Should be a complete change of scenery and water temperature.

-Tim

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Re: Your military service...

Post by Big D » Tue Nov 29, 2011 12:33 pm

I saw this just this morning and figured that I'd better post it up.
Image
Coastal Farm & Ranch formally known as "Big R"
Here's there web site:http://www.coastalfarm.com/index.cfm
They've got locations in Albany, Eugene, Woodburn, Roseburg, Cornelius, Gresham, Oregon City, Mount Vernon, Yakima and Wenatchee.
Thank you Coastal Farm & Ranch. I saved $2.10 on a new tooth brush for my dog this morning :cheers:

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Marc Martyn
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Re: Your military service...

Post by Marc Martyn » Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:38 pm

Lowe's gives a 10% discount to all active military and veterans all year on any purchase.

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Re: Your military service...

Post by Big D » Thu Dec 01, 2011 7:25 am

Marc Martyn wrote:Lowe's gives a 10% discount to all active military and veterans all year on any purchase.
So does Home Depot...

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Marc Martyn
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Re: Your military service...

Post by Marc Martyn » Thu Dec 01, 2011 11:08 am

That's interesting. Last summer when I was looking for a new BBQ, I looked at Home Depot first and then Lowes. I asked Home Depot if they give a discount to all veterans and they told me they did only on Veteran's Day and Memorial Day. To get the everyday discount, you have to have a current military issued i.d (retired or active). I went over to Lowe's and they told me that they always give a discount to all vets, regardless of how long they served. I picked out the unit I liked and the CSA went out of his way to go get me a cart, pulled it off the shelf and wheeled it up to the cashier for me. When we got up there he told the cashier I was a vet and to give me a 10% discount. He then wheeled it out to my truck and loaded it in for me. Before returning to the store, he shook my hand and thanked me for my service. I told him that was nice because the Vietnam Era vets never heard that. He replied: "That was wrong."
Home Depot may have changed their policy since then.
I am now working part time at Lowe's. [wink]

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Flying Over Fuji

Post by Mike Carey » Sun Dec 04, 2011 7:49 pm

I'm posting this from WL.com member and good friend Bob Johansen, from a story he sent me about his military days. Enjoy!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Memories of a U.S. Navy Test Flight
November 15, 1951
Written by Aviation Machinist Mate
Robert A. Johansen AD2

ON TOP OF MOUNT FUJI

The perfectly shaped, snow capped volcanic peak of Mount Fujiyama loomed majestically in the distance as the huge, cumbersome, flying boat droned through the thin air, high over the Japanese country side. Clouds and poor visibility often block the view of this beautiful mountain but today it was very clear. This mountain that last erupted in 1708 has been worshipped as a sacred mountain and is very popular with various artists including photographers.
b1.jpg
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Picture #1 - Mount Fujiyama looming majestically in the distance


The young Navy pilot and his co-pilot were in good spirits as they checked out their big patrol bomber, following a routine maintenance check on its two engines. My job, as an aircraft engine mechanic, was to accompany the PBM flight crew on the test flight and record any discrepancies on the engines. I was stationed at Oppama, Japan and assigned to Fleet Air Service Squadron 120. Our job was to maintain Navy patrol bombers consisting primarily of PBM-5s and PB4Y2s.
The big seaplane had taken off, in a shower of salt-water spray, from Yokosuka Bay and the engines were now humming smoothly. The pilots had decided to go exploring and, maybe, get a few good pictures of Japan's tallest mountain. It didn't seem to concern these young daredevils that the U.S. Military had placed a ten-mile air restriction around the mountain for all U.S. aircraft.
b2.jpg
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Picture #2 - PBM-5 taking off from Yokosuka Bay near U.S. Navy base in Oppama, Japan

"Let's go over and get some good pictures," the pilot said, as he guided his ship toward
the mountain.
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Picture #3 - The PBM-5 nears the perfectly shaped, snow capped volcanic peak of Mount Fujiyama

Crewmembers uncased their cameras and started shooting. Closer and closer we flew and cameras continued to click. I was getting just a little nervous as Mt. Fuji's up-drafts, downdrafts and brisk winds began to buffet the aircraft.
The palms of my hands were getting a little clammy as the aircraft continued on a course that would take us directly over Fuji's old volcanic crater. The pilot seemed perfectly calm and confident that his aircraft would withstand the rigors of Mount Fujiyama's violent air currents.
"O.K. Guys, get ready for some close ups," he said, as he circled his aircraft directly over
the crater.
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Picture #4 - Almost inside the crater of Mount Fujiyama (photo not taken with telephoto lens)

Navy regulations require that crews, of unpressurized aircraft, go on oxygen when flying over 10,000 feet. The pilots seemed unconcerned that we were now flying slightly higher than Mount Fujiyama's 12,385-foot peak.
Cameras clicked as the big, awkward flying boat lurched and shook in the strong air currents. I was thankful that we had done such a good job on the engines during the recent maintenance check.
"O.K. Guys, let's go down to the beach and scare some fishermen," the pilot said with a mischievous smile as he finally decided to fly away from the mountain.
The big PBM lost altitude quickly, as we approached the sandy ocean beach. Several miles of flat, straight shoreline lie ahead as the altimeter plummeted to below 50 feet. Hundreds of Japanese fishermen, working on their boats and fishing gear, lined the beach.
The pilots chuckled, as the Japanese anglers scattered in panic, as the huge plane came roaring down the beach at such a low altitude. Again, my hands were getting a little clammy. One cough of an engine or dip of a wing -- and we would surely crash in a huge ball of orange flame.
For several miles, we skimmed down the shoreline. The panicked Japanese fishermen reminded me of mice as they scampered out of the path of the approaching aircraft.
Finally, we approached a high ridge, extending out into the sea. The pilot and co-pilot seemed oblivious to the fact that the ridge was at a much higher altitude than that which we were flying. I was beginning to think they didn't see it. I was sitting directly behind them, watching through the windshield, and was wondering if maybe I should say something.
At, what seemed to be the last moment, the pilot looked over at his co-pilot and ever so casually said, "Give 'er full rich."
As the co-pilot shoved the throttles into a rich fuel mixture, the engines roared with extra power and the pilot pulled back on the yoke. The huge aircraft responded and we soared over the ridge at tree top level.
The rest of the flight was mostly uneventful. The two engines performed flawlessly and we made a smooth landing on Yokosuka Bay. As we taxied toward the ramps on the shoreline of Oppama Naval Air Station, the pilot grinned as he turned to me and said, "Good job on those engines."
Then, as he seemed to remember that I was not a member of his regular flight crew, he added, "Let's not tell anyone about our fun flight over Fuji today."
"Aye, aye, Sir," I said.
I was happy to be back on firm ground and the test flight, with the skillful but somewhat reckless young Navy pilots, was now history.
b5.jpg
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Picture #5 - A Martin Mariner PBM-5 at U.S. Navy base in Oppama, Japan

The Martin Mariner was a twin-engine maritime flying boat. It was adopted by the U.S. Navy during World War Two for anti-submarine warfare, air-sea rescue and even as a transport. A total of 1,366 of these big flying boats were built. During the Korean War the Martin Mariner was used mostly for air-sea rescue.
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Picture #6 - I worked on the big R-2800 engines that powered the PBMs
Image

"Takers get the honey, Givers sing the blues".

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Re: Flying Over Fuji

Post by Amx » Sun Dec 04, 2011 8:00 pm

AWESOME article. GREAT pictures as well. Thanks for writing that Bob, and thanks to Mike for posting it. [thumbup]
Tom.

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Re: Flying Over Fuji

Post by Gringo Pescador » Mon Dec 05, 2011 7:27 am

Very cool read - thanks!
I fish not because I regard fishing as being terribly important, but because I suspect that so many of the other concerns of men are equally unimportant, and not nearly so much fun. ~ John Volker

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